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The 7th Principle of Permaculture and Sustainable Urban Agriculture

Permaculture is a design system that is focused on creating sustainable and regenerative ecosystems. It is based on the observation of natural patterns and seeks to create systems that work with nature, rather than against it. The seventh principle of permaculture is "design from patterns to details", which encourages designers to first understand the patterns of natural systems before designing the details of their own systems. This principle is particularly important in urban agriculture, where space and resources are often limited.


Our hugelkultur beds are not only great for retaining moisture and nutrients, but they also help to mitigate drainage issues in our garden. By adding a French drain underneath our hugelkultur beds, we're able to channel excess water away from the home and move the water where we need it. It's just one of the many ways we're working to create a sustainable and resilient urban farm!

In urban agriculture, the 7th principle of permaculture can be applied in a variety of ways. By understanding the natural patterns of the environment, urban farmers can design more efficient and productive systems that make the most of the resources available to them. For example, an urban farmer might observe the patterns of rainfall and design a water catchment system that collects rainwater from roofs and stores it in a cistern. By designing the system from the pattern of rainfall, the farmer can create a more efficient irrigation system that reduces water usage and waste.


Companion planting is another way that urban farmers can apply the 7th principle of permaculture. By planting certain crops together that have mutually beneficial relationships, farmers can create a more productive and sustainable system. For example, planting beans and peas with tomatoes can provide the nitrogen that the tomatoes need to grow, reducing the need for synthetic fertilizers.


Comfrey is a great companion plant for apple trees! Its deep roots help to bring up nutrients from the soil and its leaves make a great organic fertilizer. We love using comfrey in our orchard to support the health and productivity of our trees.
Comfrey is a great companion plant for apple trees! Its deep roots help to bring up nutrients from the soil and its leaves make a great organic fertilizer. We love using comfrey in our orchard to support the health and productivity of our trees.


In addition to water catchment and companion planting, urban farmers can also use techniques such as vertical gardening, container gardening, and aquaponics to create efficient and productive systems in small spaces. By observing the patterns of the environment and designing from the pattern to the details, urban farmers can create systems that are not only productive, but also regenerative and sustainable.


In conclusion, the 7th principle of permaculture is an important concept for urban farmers to understand and apply. By designing from patterns to details, urban farmers can create sustainable and regenerative systems that make the most of the resources available to them. Whether you're growing in a small backyard garden or on a rooftop farm, the principles of permaculture can help you to create a productive and sustainable urban agriculture system.


Farmer John

 

Help Us Grow!


At Rusty Top Farms, we're dedicated to supporting our veterans and helping them experience the healing power of gardening. We're currently raising funds to build garden crates for veterans who may not have access to a garden or who may need extra support to get started.


Each garden crate costs us $300 to build, and we rely on donations from our community to make this project possible.





If you'd like to support our mission and help us build garden crates for veterans, please consider making a donation through our fiscal sponsor at https://www.rustytopfarm.com/donate .


Every donation counts and makes a difference in the lives of our veterans.


Thank you for your support and let's continue to work together to support our veterans and build a more resilient community!


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