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6 Books That Have Inspired My Journey in Urban Agriculture

As an urban farmer, I've read a lot of books about sustainable agriculture, permaculture, and other related topics. These books have not only inspired me to grow my own food, but also to share my knowledge and passion with others.



Teamwork getting rid of the lawn for the backyard farm.


Please note that this post contains Amazon affiliate links, which means I may earn a small commission from qualifying purchases made through these links. However, please be assured that I only recommend books and products that I have personally read and found valuable in my journey in urban agriculture. Any commission earned through these links helps to support the maintenance and development of this blog, but it will not affect the price you pay for the product. Thank you for supporting my work in sustainable agriculture.


Here are six books that have influenced my journey in urban agriculture:

  1. Public Produce: Cultivating Our Parks, Plazas, and Streets for Healthier Cities by Darrin Nordahl. This book explores the idea of turning public spaces into productive landscapes that provide fresh, healthy food for everyone. It's a great resource for anyone interested in community gardening, food justice, or urban planning.

  2. Fruitful Labor: The Ecology, Economy, and Practice of a Family Farm by Mike Madison. This book tells the story of a family farm in California and the challenges and rewards of farming sustainably. It's a great read for anyone interested in the economics of small-scale farming or the intersection of agriculture and ecology.

  3. Surviving the Future: Culture, Carnival and Capital in the Aftermath of the Market Economy by David Fleming. This book is a thought-provoking exploration of how we can create a more sustainable and equitable world in the face of climate change, economic inequality, and other challenges.

  4. Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants by Robin Wall Kimmerer. This beautiful book blends indigenous knowledge and scientific understanding to explore the relationship between humans and the natural world. It's a must-read for anyone interested in the intersection of ecology, spirituality, and social justice.

  5. Saving Us: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Healing in a Divided World by Katharine Hayhoe. This book is a powerful call to action on climate change, but it's also a deeply personal reflection on how we can find hope and healing in the face of environmental challenges. It's a great read for anyone looking for inspiration and practical steps they can take to make a difference.

  6. The Sharing Solution: How to Save Money, Simplify Your Life & Build Community by Janelle Orsi and Emily Doskow. This book explores the idea of sharing as a way to create more resilient, sustainable communities. It covers everything from car-sharing to community gardens to co-housing, and it's a great resource for anyone interested in alternative models of living and working.

These books have all been instrumental in shaping my thinking about urban agriculture, and I highly recommend them to anyone who shares my passion for sustainable food systems and resilient communities.


Farmer John

 

Help Us Grow!


At Rusty Top Farms, we're dedicated to supporting our veterans and helping them experience the healing power of gardening. We're currently raising funds to build garden crates for veterans who may not have access to a garden or who may need extra support to get started.

Each garden crate costs us $300 to build, and we rely on donations from our community to make this project possible. If you'd like to support our mission and help us build garden crates for veterans, please consider making a donation through our fiscal sponsor at https://www.rustytopfarm.com/donate . Every donation counts and makes a difference in the lives of our veterans.

Thank you for your support and let's continue to work together to support our veterans and build a more resilient community!


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